De alumni-avond Fysica van de Universiteit Antwerpen is voor onderzoekers en studenten van het Departement Fysica het moment bij uitstek om in contact te komen met fysici die actief zijn buiten de academische wereld. Bovendien biedt deze avond aan alle alumni van de richting de kans om oude bekenden terug te zien en de nieuwe garde fysici te leren kennen.

18u30: Welkomstdrink

19u00: Presentaties van alumni

  • Maarten Baeten: Validator bij Argenta
  • Jan Buytaert: Senior System Engineer bij Verhaert
  • Anke Van Averbeke: Leerkracht fysica in het secundair onderwijs
  • Senne Van Rompaey: Junior ICT Analyst bij Fluxys

20u30: Receptie


Vrijdag 5 mei 2017

Campus Drie Eiken Q


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Dear fellow physicists,

It is our pleasure to announce the next Departmental Physics Colloquium. On Tuesday, March 7, 2017, Prof. dr. Jean Dalibard from Collège de France and Laboratoire Kastler Brossel will present a talk entitled "Topology in atomic Flatland", on work closely related to the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics. The abstract and practical information are included below.

We hope to see you all there.


Speaker

Prof. dr. Jean Dalibard

Title

Topology in atomic Flatland

Abstract

The physics of many-body systems strongly depends on their dimensionality. For example, in a two-dimensional world, most standard phase transitions towards an ordered state of matter would not occur, because of the increased role of fluctuations. However, non-conventional "topological" transitions can still take place, as understood initially by Kosterlitz and Thouless.

During the last decade, a novel environment has been developed for the study of low-dimensional physics. It consists of cold atomic gases confined in tailor-made light traps, forming thus a thin layer of material particles. In this talk, we will review some key aspects of these quantum 2D gases, such as their transition to a superfluid state. We will also address other topology-related effects in these systems, in relation with the creation of artificial gauge fields and quantum-Hall type phenomena.


Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Campus Groenenborger T105

16:00 - 17:00 Colloquium

17:00 - 18:00 Reception


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It is our pleasure to announce the first Departmental Physics Colloquium of the new academic year. On Thursday, September 29, 2016, we welcome Prof. dr. Eva Y. Andrei from Rutgers University for a talk entitled "The Physics of Imperfect Graphene". The abstract and practical information are included below.

Speaker

Prof. dr. Eva Y. Andrei
Rutgers University

Title

The Physics of Imperfect Graphene

Abstract

Graphene in its pristine form has transformed our understanding of 2D electron systems, leading to fundamental discoveries and to the promise of important applications. In the colloquium, new and surprising phenomena that emerge when the perfect honeycomb lattice of graphene is disrupted will be presented. In particular, we will focus on the effects of single atom vacancies on graphene's electronic and magnetic properties as revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. These include the ability to charge the vacancy site into the supercritical regime where atomic collapse leads to the formation of an artificial atom and the observation of electrostatically controlled Kondo screening of the vacancy's magnetic moment.


Thursday, September 29, 2016

Campus Groenenborger V009

16:00 - 17:00 Colloquium

17:00 - 18:00 Reception


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It is our pleasure to announce the next Physics Colloquium. On Tuesday, May 17, 2016, Prof. dr. Thomas Hertog from KU Leuven will present a talk entitled "The Discovery of Gravitational Waves". The abstract and practical information are included below.

Speaker

Prof. dr. Thomas Hertog
KU Leuven

Title

The Discovery of Gravitational Waves

Abstract

On 14 September 2015 at 10:51am an international team of scientists observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime, called gravitational waves, arriving at Earth from the merger of two black holes more than 1.3 billion years ago. This landmark discovery confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos that may well stretch all the way back to the big bang. In the colloquium, we will discover the significance of gravitational waves and what they can tell us about the universe.


Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Campus Groenenborger T105

16:00 - 17:00 Colloquium

17:00 - 18:00 Reception


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Recorded video

On December 17, UA alumna Dr. Martine De Maziere is giving a lecture on her research in aeronomy (the study of the upper atmosphere) as the Head of Department at the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy.

Speaker

Martin De Maziere
Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy
Ghent University

Title

Tracking emission sources by remote sensing of the atmospheric composition

Abstract

The presentation will explain the principles of remote sensing of the atmospheric composition and its application to greenhouse gas and air quality measurements. Using inverse modeling techniques, we can derive so-called top-down emissions and make the distinction between various sources of emission like fires and human activity.


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Recorded video

On October 20th 2015, Prof. Dr. Christian Van den Broeck of Hassel University is giving a talk to the physics department on his research into thermodynamics.

Speaker

Prof. Dr. Christian Van den Broeck
Hasselt University

Title

Thermodynamic Efficiency Revisited

Abstract

We will review the definition of thermodynamic efficiency. Based on a new, generalised version of the second law of thermodynamics, we will derive universal features of the efficiency at maximum power and of the stochastic efficiency of small machines (sub-micron scale, e.g. Brownian motors and quantum dot photoelectric devices). We will subsequently revisit the implications for the Onsager symmetry.


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Recorded video

On september 15th 2015, Prof. Dr. Richard James will give a departmental colloquium about his research into multiferroic materials.

Speaker

Prof. Dr. Richard D. James
University of Minnesota

Title

New materials: real and imagined

Abstract

In this talk I will give some examples of recently discovered materials that would have been considered unlikely a few years ago. They are crystalline materials that undergo strong first-order phase transformations and yet exhibit a high degree of reversibility and vanishingly small hysteresis. Some of these materials also exhibit "multiferroism”: abrupt changes of magnetization, or polarization, and strain at the transformation that suggest interesting applications to energy conversion. We also speculate on how to search in a systematic way for broad classes of interesting, yet undiscovered, nanoscale multiferroic materials.


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Recorded video

On Tuesday March 31st 2015, we welcome Prof. Dr. Francis Halzen, who is the director of the IceCube experiment on Antarctica. He will give a talk about the IceCube neutrino detector and his work on cosmic neutrinos.

Speaker

Prof. Dr. Francis Halzen
Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center
Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Title

IceCube and the Discovery of High-Energy Cosmic Neutrinos

Abstract

The IceCube project has transformed one cubic kilometer of natural Antarctic ice into a neutrino detector. The instrument detects 100,000 neutrinos per year in the GeV to PeV energy range. Among those, we have recently isolated a flux of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. I will discuss the instrument, the analysis of the data, and the significance of the discovery of cosmic neutrinos.


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Recorded video

The physics department is excited to announce that Prof. Leo Kouwenhoven is giving a lecture about his recent experiments on Majorana fermions. Professor Kouwenhoven (TUDelft) is well known for his contributions on the experimental realization and detection of these exotic quasi-particles.

Speaker

Prof. Dr. Leo Kouwenhoven
QuTech and Kavli Institute of Nanoscience
Delft University of Technology

Title

The quest for Majorana particles

Abstract

Hunting for a new particle, not in a huge accelerator, but instead in a nanoscale electronic chip. The search for Majorana fermions stretches from detectors scanning the cosmos to the properties of special superconductors. These Majoranas have the mysterious property that they are equal to their anti-particles, which implies that they have zero spin, zero charge and zero energy. How to detect three times nothing? In this lecture, Leo Kouwenhoven will discuss their observation of the first signatures for the existence of Majoranas. Moreover, he will explain the connection between Majoranas and quantum computers.

Intersted students can find some introductionairy information into the subject on: http://www.2physics.com/2012/05/signatures-of-majorana-fermions-in.html


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Recorded video

Speaker

Prof. Dr. Conny Aerts
Institute of Astronomy, KULeuven, Belgium
Department of Astrophysics, Radbound Universiteit Nijmegen, Netherlands

Title

Asteroseismology: the revolution in stellar physics

Abstract

The interiors of stars are not directly accessible for scientific experiment. This is problematic, because the life of stars, and by implication of galaxies in the Universe, is directed by the physical processes acting in their core regions. How do stars rotate internally? How do the products of nucleosynthesis mix inside stars? Do stars have an internal magnetic field? Thanks to the recent research domain of asteroseismology we can now start to answer these questions for various types of stars through interpretation of their oscillation frequencies. During the talk, we explain the basic principles of asteroseismology and we illustrate the immense advantage of having long-term uninterrupted high-precision data from space missions. We review the current status of the probing of stellar physics in general, and of the measurement of internal rotation and angular momentum in particular. We end with future prospects by highlighting the potential of asteroseismology as a tool in the study of galactic archaeology and of exoplanetary systems.


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Recorded video